This is not me, although I do tie my shoes…so there’s that.

How I went from running 0 to 5 miles in a month.

Barry W. Enderwick

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UPDATE 4/23: Well, I reached my goal of running 5 miles, 3 times a week. Several times. Which is to say, I have struggled to continue to run that distance with that frequency. Not because of tiredness or my lungs hurting but because my legs aren’t strong enough.

After the age of 50, we all start to lose muscle mass. I took the year or so I took off from running at age 52. Since coming back, leg strength has been a vexing issue. But this dilemma helped me see that getting to 5 miles shouldn’t have been the goal per se. I what I should be doing is focusing on fitness such that I can run 5 miles, 3 times a week.

So I’ve settled in at 4.15 miles, 3 times a week. It’s not super easy but it’s also not too difficult. For me the distance is taking a back seat to fitness. To that end, I’ve started doing body weight exercises 3 times a week. And after just a couple of weeks, it feels like it is paying off.

I’ll probably stay here for a bit as I work on pace. Then move on to see how far I can run next. When that happens, I’ll come back and update again. Cheers!

UPDATE: After several start/stops I am finally back to a regular schedule of running. But I’ve modified the approach I outlined below. This time out I assumed zero fitness. So I started with run a block, walk a block on a 5 mile route. After about a week of that I moved to walk a block, run two blocks. Then a week later, walk a block run three blocks. One week after that I moved to what I outlined below, I ran as far as I could non-stop then walked a block, ran a block. But it was at this point that I struck an another approach to build on my previous one.

For each run I set three goals. At first I thought of them as good, better, best. But then I realized, there are going to be days where I just can make the good goal. So what does that mean, what I did was not good? That’s BS. I was out running, that in itself is good. So I’ve reframed them to be great, greater, greatest. That way if I fall short of great, I still did good. Framing and positivity (not toxic positivity) matter in motivating yourself. Believe me.

Now when I go running along on my 5 mile route, instead of running as far as I can and doing the walk a block/run a block after, I set specific goals for that…

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Barry W. Enderwick

Brand/marketing executive, Kaizen (ex Netflix). I write on startups, strategy, business, culture & design. Also Sandwiches Of History on Insta/TikTok/YouTube